Traditional recipes

The UK Is Suffering from a Vegetable Shortage

The UK Is Suffering from a Vegetable Shortage

British supermarket customers are only allowed three lettuces per shopping trip due to a vegetable shortage

You don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.

Oh my aubergine! Across the pond, a vegetable shortage has left shoppers frazzled and lacking in greenery. Between that and an unusual cold snap in Italy, European customers are finding eggplant (aubergine in the UK), zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, and lettuce in short supply.

The vegetable shortage has been particularly hard on Britons, who import half of their vegetables and 90 percent of their fruit. In fact, at outlets of the huge Tesco and Sainsbury’s supermarket chains, customers are being rationed three lettuces per visit. Shoppers are reportedly having trouble finding fresh eggplant and spinach, and settling for frozen vegetables instead, according to the UK Independent. When fresh produce is available, prices have skyrocketed by as much as 18 percent.

“Salad leaves are the sexiest they’ve ever been,” says Dieter Lloyd, spokesman for the British Leafy Salads Association, “It’s not until you say to people, ‘No you can’t have it,’ that suddenly everyone says ‘but I want it,’” he told The Wall Street Journal.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


UK supermarkets predict shortage of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit

Supermarkets and wholesalers are warning shoppers of shortages of lettuce, broccoli and citrus fruit around Christmas after France banned hauliers carrying freight across the Channel in an effort to contain the spread of the new coronavirus strain.

The environment secretary, George Eustice, held an emergency call with supermarket executives on Monday afternoon to discuss the situation as retailers expressed concerns that the lorry ban could combine with Brexit disruption to cause serious difficulties for shops.

Retailers said the ingredients for a traditional Christmas lunch, such as turkey, carrots, peas, potatoes, parsnips and brussels sprouts were mostly produced in the UK and available to buy, but some shelves could soon be empty of some fresh produce imported from Europe.

“If nothing changes, we will start to see gaps over the coming days on lettuce, some salad leaves, cauliflowers, broccoli and citrus fruit – all of which are imported from the continent at this time of year,” said a Sainsbury’s spokesperson.

“We hope the UK and French governments can come to a mutually agreeable solution that prioritises the immediate passage of produce and any other food at the ports.”

Sainsbury’s added that it was “sourcing everything we can from the UK and looking into alternative transport for product sourced from Europe”.

Tesco encouraged customers to “shop as normal” as it had plenty of food up to 25 December.

A spokesperson said: “We don’t expect any problems with availability for Christmas, but if the current disruption continues then there may be reduced supply on a limited number of fresh items, such as lettuce, cauliflower and citrus fruit, later this week.”

Other big supermarkets and suppliers said they were also well-stocked with Christmas favourites but that supplies close to and after 25 December could be more difficult. One said the situation was “very unclear and slightly outside of our hands”.

Other crops that could be affected by the French move include tomatoes, courgettes, sweet peppers, flowers and tropical fruits, some of which are flown into mainland Europe and then driven via France to the UK.

At least one supermarket chain and some wholesalers are considering flying in salads and other items if the problems persist but high costs and low availability of air freight capacity are likely to mean only a small amount of goods could be moved in this way. Other options being explored include increasing direct shipments from Holland and Spain, although capacity on ferries from those countries is limited.


Watch the video: Αξίζει να κοπιάζεις για τα πιο φρέσκα λαχανικά και φαίνεται. Lidl Hellas (December 2021).