Traditional recipes

Sautéed Greens

Sautéed Greens


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Ingredients

  • 1 pound Swiss chard or other greens, such as kale
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped onion

Recipe Preparation

  • Rinse greens. Drain and cut leaves and stems into 1/4"-1/2" strips and pieces.

  • In a large skillet, heat extra-virgin olive oil over medium heat. Add stems, garlic cloves, and onion and sauté until onion softens. Add the leaves and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 5 minutes. Finish with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 185.8 %Calories from Fat 68.8 Fat (g) 14.2 Saturated Fat (g) 2.0 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 13.2 Dietary Fiber (g) 4.8 Total Sugars (g) 3.5 Net Carbs (g) 8.4 Protein (g) 4.4 Sodium (mg) 371.1Reviews Section

Sauteed Greens

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

These Sauteed Greens are a very simple, but super nutritious dish and a favorite go-to when I don’t have enough time. I like to serve it over rice, or in this case, quinoa salad.

Sauteed Greens have powerhouse nutrition and here’s what Dr. Fuhrman has to say…

“Raw leafy greens contain only about 100 calories per pound and are packed with nutrients. Leafy greens contain substances that protect blood vessels and are associated with reduced risk of diabetes.

Greens are an excellent tool for weight loss since they can be consumed in virtually unlimited quantities. Leafy greens are also the most nutrient-dense of all foods.

Green vegetables are rich in folate (the natural form of folic acid), calcium, and contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids.

Be sure to try these plant-based sides:

Leafy greens are also rich in antioxidant pigments called carotenoids, specifically lutein and zeaxanthin, which are the carotenoids known to promote healthy vision.

Also, several leafy greens and other green vegetables (such as bok choy, broccoli, and kale) belong to the cruciferous family of vegetables.” And, we all know how healthy those are!


Sautéed Collard Greens

Think greens need to be boiled into a mush before serving? Think again. Along with a pan of hot cornbread, make these tender greens a regular part of your Southern vegetable plate or serve alongside pulled pork or fried chicken. Sautéed with onions, salt, pepper, and other flavorings, this quick and easy side dish comes together in just minutes, meaning there is no reason you can&rsquot serve a healthy, fresh, and delicious side dish with supper even on a busy weeknight. Any type of tender green, such as baby kale, turnip greens, collards, and even spinach, works well in this recipe. Always use fresh greens, never frozen. Whenever possible, choose loose leaves instead of bagged greens, as the bags tend to have more stems than the leafy whole plants, and the stems are not so tender. This recipe is quick and easy and, while the slow-simmer method in a Dutch oven is sometimes preferred, you don&rsquot always have that much time to prepare a meal. Don&rsquot forget to add the rice vinegar to the pan. If you. Have never made greens before, this might seem like a strange addition, but the vinegar adds a tangy note that brightens the dish and, along with the tablespoon of sugar, balances out the flavors. Play around with the flavor profile. If you like things on the spicy side, bump up the heat with more peppers or add a teaspoon (or more) of red pepper flakes. Fry up some chopped bacon, use a tablespoon of bacon grease instead of the sesame oil, and then add the chopped bacon into the finished dish. Remember a plate of greens isn&rsquot complete without a bottle of hot pepper vinegar or hot sauce on the table.


Sautéed Stinging Nettles

Stinging nettles have been used for centuries as food, as a component in traditional medicine, and also as fiber for clothing. Tricky to handle because of their prickly leaves and capacity to cause urticaria rash, stinging nettles are actually a super flavorful green. When cooked properly, their spinach-like flavor is wonderful in soups, pesto sauces, beverages, and many dishes in which you'd otherwise use leafy greens. A brief exposure to high heat tames these prickly vines and transforms them into a flavorful dish of earthy and bright flavors. Serve these simple nettles all on their own, as a side for any protein of your liking, or to top pasta or pizzas for a hit of brilliant green.

Don't be intimidated by their prickly fame, as eating nettles is a delicious and cheap way of getting your greens in. By eating a cup of cooked nettles you get over 6 grams of fiber and 2 of protein, plus 428 mg of calcium, almost 20 percent of the recommended daily intake for adults.

Nettles need to be thoroughly cleaned and de-stung before eating. To do this, the easiest method is blanching them in boiling water and rinsing them afterward, squeezing out the water before sauteeing them or adding them into soups or stews. By blanching the nettles, they get cleaned and broken down in one fell swoop. If you're foraging nettles yourself, first be absolutely sure what you're foraging are indeed nettles, and secondly don't pick any nettles that grow near busy roads or that have been sprayed with fertilizers or chemicals.


Sautéed Chicory Greens Southern Italian Style

Eating bitter chicory greens is an ancient tradition in the Italian cuisine, especially in the southern regions. For centuries people used to hand-pick the wild variety of this plant in the surrounding areas of their homes and cook it right away, sometimes sautéed and sometimes simply boiled. I can even recall that when I was a little girl, my grandmother used to go out in the rain during spring time to pick the freshest chicory she could find.

Today however, there is no need to hunt for chicory in the wild as it is becoming way more common to find this nutrient-packed vegetable also in the supermarkets. I can assure you that if you cook it properly, the taste is quite as good. In fact, raw chicory has a strong bitter and spicy flavour, but if you boil it for just a few minutes it becomes mild and delicious.

This recipe is a staple in my family and everyone loves it. Besides, it pairs the benefits of eating leafy vegetables with all the great distinctive ingredients used in the southern Italian cuisine like capers, anchovies in oil and chili flakes. And the best part? It takes just a few minutes to prepare.

As it has quite a powerful flavour, this side dish pairs perfectly with simple and healthy mains like grilled fish or steamed chicken. Moreover, it can also be reinvented as a great pasta sauce.

As a side note, if you like this recipe, but you cannot find chicory greens at your local grocery store, you can replace them with any kind of bitter leafy vegetable of your liking such as endive, escarole, radicchio or even dandelion leaves. In this case, however, I would suggest you to blanch the greens just for a few seconds instead of boiling them down or just skip boiling them altogether.


Mexican-style Sauteed Greens Recipe

You know what never happens? I never make at home for dinner something that I am currently teaching in one of my classes. Why? Because I normally eat it several times a week and I am not super motivated to eat it any more than that, no matter how good it is! This is even more true towards the end of the month after I have taught the same recipes a dozen or more times.

Well, never say never because I have been teaching this Mexican-style sautéed greens recipe all month and I made it for dinner Monday night. Why? Because there is never any left after my class! Everyone has just gone crazy for this recipe and finished every last morsel before I had my chance. I look forward to these slightly spicy, tart greens and then….none for me.

I am really obsessed with Mexican food. I love the bright, fresh, punchy flavors. And the ingredients are easy to come by in Southern California. I do find it hard, though, to come up with a wide variety of vegetable side dishes to complement whatever Mexican main dish I am making. I have a lot of salads in my repertoire. If you haven’t tried my Mexican Chopped Salad or my Avocado, Jicama and Mango Salad or the Cilantro Lime Slaw, those are just fabulous and deliver a lot of nutrition at the same time.

But when I stumbled up this recipe for Quelites, I knew I found a new favorite Mexican side dish. Quelites actually refer to a type of weed, also known as lamb’s quarters, but in the above mentioned recipe, mustard greens are used. Mustard greens are a tad bitter for my husband and Mr. Picky, so I tried this recipe with lots of combinations of milder greens, like spinach, baby kale and chard, as well as dinosaur kale. Love, love, love, love, LOVE!

What I like best about this recipe is how the acidity from the lemon juice and the sweetness from the tomatoes tone down any bitterness from the greens (if you’re using mature kale, for example.) I don’t think this recipe is very hot, even with an entire jalapeño, although I do remove the seeds, which is where the heat is more concentrated. But it’s hot enough for my heat-averse guys. I just add a few shakes of hot sauce to my greens and I’m happy.

I have eaten these Mexican-style greens with rice and beans (so simple and so good!), as well as chicken enchiladas and tacos. If you follow me on Instagram or Facebook, you saw that I made them for dinner this week with a veggie paella (Spanish, not Mexican, but so what) and then the next day with scrambled eggs and a corn tortilla. Whatever you’re making for Cinco de Mayo, this will be the perfect, healthful side!


Mexican-style Sauteed Greens Recipe

You know what never happens? I never make at home for dinner something that I am currently teaching in one of my classes. Why? Because I normally eat it several times a week and I am not super motivated to eat it any more than that, no matter how good it is! This is even more true towards the end of the month after I have taught the same recipes a dozen or more times.

Well, never say never because I have been teaching this Mexican-style sautéed greens recipe all month and I made it for dinner Monday night. Why? Because there is never any left after my class! Everyone has just gone crazy for this recipe and finished every last morsel before I had my chance. I look forward to these slightly spicy, tart greens and then….none for me.

I am really obsessed with Mexican food. I love the bright, fresh, punchy flavors. And the ingredients are easy to come by in Southern California. I do find it hard, though, to come up with a wide variety of vegetable side dishes to complement whatever Mexican main dish I am making. I have a lot of salads in my repertoire. If you haven’t tried my Mexican Chopped Salad or my Avocado, Jicama and Mango Salad or the Cilantro Lime Slaw, those are just fabulous and deliver a lot of nutrition at the same time.

But when I stumbled up this recipe for Quelites, I knew I found a new favorite Mexican side dish. Quelites actually refer to a type of weed, also known as lamb’s quarters, but in the above mentioned recipe, mustard greens are used. Mustard greens are a tad bitter for my husband and Mr. Picky, so I tried this recipe with lots of combinations of milder greens, like spinach, baby kale and chard, as well as dinosaur kale. Love, love, love, love, LOVE!

What I like best about this recipe is how the acidity from the lemon juice and the sweetness from the tomatoes tone down any bitterness from the greens (if you’re using mature kale, for example.) I don’t think this recipe is very hot, even with an entire jalapeño, although I do remove the seeds, which is where the heat is more concentrated. But it’s hot enough for my heat-averse guys. I just add a few shakes of hot sauce to my greens and I’m happy.

I have eaten these Mexican-style greens with rice and beans (so simple and so good!), as well as chicken enchiladas and tacos. If you follow me on Instagram or Facebook, you saw that I made them for dinner this week with a veggie paella (Spanish, not Mexican, but so what) and then the next day with scrambled eggs and a corn tortilla. Whatever you’re making for Cinco de Mayo, this will be the perfect, healthful side!


Sautéed Beet Greens and Swiss Chard

Some of you may know I have a little garden in my backyard. I say little and people don&rsquot believe me thanks to all the vegetables I harvest from it. I have two 4 x 8 raised garden beds. For the past month, I&rsquove meant to harvest my beets and swiss chard. I finally had the chance the other day. Little did I realize that my sink would be full of vegetables. My husband wasn&rsquot too happy when we planted our winter crop and &frac13 of our tiny raised garden beds were consumed by beets and swiss chard. He isn&rsquot in to the earthy greens and root vegetables like I am. I think overall he did enjoy the Sautéed Beet Greens and Swiss Chard I made for us the other night. So hopefully, that means I&rsquoll get to plant them again next year in the garden.

Growing up I ate canned pickled beets. In my 7-year old bran, it was such a treat to eat these for dinner! I told you I was a vegetable-loving (freak of nature) as a kid. What kid loves pickled beets?

As I&rsquove gotten older, I&rsquove come to enjoy the fresh variety of the root vegetable over the canned. I enjoy beets and to be honest one of the only reason why I grew beets was to sauté the beet greens. In my book they are like 10 times better than the beet themselves. But since I enjoy both I figured this was a win-win vegetable to grow in my book! I could sauté the greens and pickle the beets. I plan to go to a canning session while in Austin, Texas at BlogHer Food this weekend. Hopefully upon my return I&rsquoll be pickling the beets I boiled and canning them!

If you plan to grow beets in the winter next year here is some food for thought.

  • Do plant the seeds directly into the ground
  • Don&rsquot just pour the packet of seeds into the ground. Be meticulous and spread out the seeds. I think my beets could have gotten much larger had they had more room to grow. I.e., I just poured the packet in the ground and hoped for the best!
  • Do harvest the beet greens before it gets hot out. Greens get bitter as the weather gets warmer.

Next time you buy beets from the store (or grow them in my case), do not discard the coveted beet green tops! Clean them well, chop them up, and sauté them to make my Sautéed Beet Greens and Swiss Chard. If you only have one of the varieties&ndashit&rsquos ok. The recipe will still work and taste delicious.


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Watch the video: How To Cook Collard Greens Quickly. Easy Sauteed Collard Greens. Episode 90 (May 2022).